Digging Up Bethlehem Steel’s History In Latin America

BethSteelinChile

A Virtual presentation from the National Museum of Industrial History

JANUARY 23 @ 3:00 PM – 4:30 PM

While the rise and fall of Bethlehem Steel is well-documented, the Corporation’s global impact particularly from places where they sourced raw materials is less well-known. From 1913 until 1971, the Bethlehem Steel Corporation operated iron mines in Chile, shipping ore to the US through the Panama Canal. Chilean iron ore was essential to Bethlehem Steel’s World War II production, cementing the ties between Latin America and the Lehigh Valley.

While the histories of Mexican and Puerto Rican workers illustrate Bethlehem Steel’s labor linkages, this talk provides a new perspective on the Lehigh Valley’s long-standing relationship with Latin America by illuminating Bethlehem Steel’s mining operations in Chile. Various engineers, geologists, and Bethlehem Steel executives worked on the Chilean mining projects, and many brought families and built lives in the mining towns or surrounding areas near La Serena, Chile. Through these connections Chileans also came to study, work and live in the Lehigh Valley in the 20th century.

This virtual talk explores the history of Bethlehem Steel’s iron mining operations in Chile, the transnational flows of raw materials and people and Bethlehem Steel’s legacy in Latin America.

The goal of this project is to research the history of Bethlehem Steel’s iron ore mining operations in Latin America, with a plan to present findings in academic journals, museum exhibits, public lectures, and/or documentaries. Some of the core questions that guide this project are: What role did iron ore extracted from Latin America play in Bethlehem Steel’s production processes? And, how did the Bethlehem Steel Corporation (& its subsidiaries) impact the regions where they had mining operations?

If you have memories, photos, documents, or contacts that you are interested in sharing with the project, we would love to hear from you. Please visit https://forms.gle/ch6q41eMfbQjksm68 with whatever information you are able to share, and we will be in touch.

PLEASE REGISTER TO RECEIVE A ZOOM LINK TO THIS EVENT.

 

 

The Neon Museum of Philadelphia has found a permanent home

After decades of work, a sign designer’s dream is finally coming true.

neonmuseum-michaelawinberg

Museum founder Len Davidson shows off his crab: MICHAELA WINBERG / BILLY PENN

The article outlines the long career of Philadelphia Len Davidson whose interests led him to collect and create neon signs.
https://billypenn.com/2019/08/11/the-neon-museum-of-philadelphia-has-found-a-permanent-home/

Friday, January 15th the will be a virtual opening of the museum from 7-8:30. This link takes you to further information on the event and a link to join the zoom meeting.

http://neonmuseumofphiladelphia.com/news/virtual-grand-opening

 

Edward Francis Grusheski

Ed Grusheski, president of the Oliver Evans chapter since 1996, died December 23, 2020.  Ed contributed to so many programs and institutions in the city yet he always had time for our Oliver Evans Chapter. He led the chapter with grace and spirit despite several major health setbacks in recent years. He was a gallant, brave gentleman. We will be diminished without benefit of his caring,  generous heart.
There is no information yet on memorial services in his name. Family and friends are making arrangements and will share that information with us. Here is an obituary they have provided. 

Edward Francis Grusheski

On December 23, 2020, Edward Francis Grusheski of Philadelphia, passed away at the age of 74. Ed was born in Boston, the son of Marian Grusheski. Ed graduated from Boston Latin School, Georgetown University and earned a master’s degree in American Civilization at the University of Pennsylvania. He also was stationed in Asia while serving in the US Army as a voice intercept operator.

Ed’s most proud accomplishment was leading the development of the historic Fairmount Water Works into the region’s premier urban environmental education destination, dedicated to fostering shared stewardship of our shared water resources. Ed continued his relationship with the Fairmount Water Works through the rest of his life when he became a consultant, educator, and speaker, giving voice to environmental issues.

Ed exuded enormous optimism and enthusiasm throughout life as a constant learner, world traveler and art collector. He was active in and a contributor to countless programs and institutions in Philadelphia including serving on the boards of the Global Water Alliance, the Fund for the Water Works, and as the president of the local chapter of the Society for Industrial Archeology.

He leaves behind many loved cousins and cherished friends. Ed was a joyful and generous gentleman who enjoyed a life well lived.

In lieu of flowers donations may be made in honor of Ed to either:
Old Saint Joseph’s
321 Willings Alley
Philadelphia, PA 19106
Fairmount Water Works Interpretive Center
640 Waterworks Dr.
Philadelphia, PA 19130

Another obituary was written by his associates at the Global Water Alliance where Ed was a Founding Board Member.
https://www.globalwateralliance.net/in-memoriam/

Ed is now under the care of Cremation Society of Pennsylvania, Inc. at King of Prussia. The Society web page has a link to share a memory of Ed.
https://obituaries.cremationofpennsylvania.com/obituaries/blue-bell-pa/edward-grusheski-9964437

Finally, here is a link to an article by Ed on his beloved Fairmount Waterworks written in 2004 and posted on Watershapes, a website on our water environment and its structures.
https://watershapes.com/travelogues-history/historic-treatments.html