Society for Industrial Archeology

49th Annual Conference

August 23-27, 2021
Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania

The Anthracite Heritage Museum, National Museum of Industrial History (NMIH), and the National Canal Museum, a program of the Delaware & Lehigh National Heritage Corridor, invite you to join the Society for Industrial Archeology in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, which has been rescheduled for August 24-27, 2021.  We welcome everyone to join together to celebrate the Lehigh Valley’s unique legacy as the cradle of American industrialization.

Registration for the Society for Industrial Archeology’s 49th Annual Conference August 23-27 in Pennsylvania’s Lehigh Valley opens Tuesday, July 13 at 6 a.m. Eastern Time. Please follow the link below to the conference web page for more details about the conference and, starting next Tuesday, to find links to register online!

SIA Lehigh Valley 2021 Conference Web Page

Tour descriptions and the program of paper sessions have been added to the conference web page in advance of online registration.

PLEASE NOTE: 49th Annual Conference registrants must read the SIA Covid Statement and agree to abide by the terms and conditions stated therein in order to participate in the conference.

The Lehigh Navigation: How a Waterway Changed the Nation

Martha Capwell Fox

 A presentation of the Pennsylvania Canal Society

Tuesday June 15, 2021
 7:00 – 8:00 PM
(30 minutes of presentation
followed by 30 minutes of Q & A)

The Lehigh Coal & Navigation Company was the first to move anthracite coal efficiently and profitably from mine to market. This was accomplished first by making the Lehigh River navigable by a series of “bear trap” dams, and then constructing the two-way Lehigh Navigation between Mauch Chunk and Easton.
With highly profitable anthracite delivery established, the company searched for an effective process of smelting iron ore with their anthracite coal.  In late 1838, the Welsh ironmaster David Thomas was hired to build the first commercially and technologically successful anthracite iron furnace along Lock 36 in Catasauqua.  For the first time, large quantities of high-quality iron could be made quickly in the US–thus triggering the American Industrial Revolution.
About the Presenter:  Martha Capwell Fox has been the historian and archives coordinator for the National Canal Museum and the Delaware & Lehigh National Heritage Corridor since 2012.  She is the author of three papers that were presented at Canal History and Technology symposia, on the silk industry in the D&L Corridor (2002), 19th century entrepreneur Jose de Navarro (2010), and the industrial history of Catasauqua (2011), and the book covering the history of the D&L Corridor, Geography, Geology, and Genius: how coal and canals ignited the American Industrial Revolution (2019).
A fifth generation Catasauquan, she has been fascinated by the histories of the canal and borough since childhood. After graduating from American University, Martha worked for National Geographic and Rodale Press prior to the Canal Museum.

Zoom meeting link:  https://us02web.zoom.us/j/81503237801?pwd=NnRValJXNktUS1ZWMWJlSWNpVkFNdz09

 If you use the above link you shouldn’t need these, but they are here in case you do.
Zoom Meeting ID: 815 0323 7801
Zoom Passcode: 009912

 

Abandoned canals of the Schuylkill navigation

Tue, June 8, 2021
12:00 PM – 1:00 PM EDT

A talk by Sandy Sorlien
presented by The Athenaeum of Philadelphia

A Philadelphia native and longtime Manayunk Canal neighbor, Sandy is an Environmental Photographer and tour developer for the Fairmount Water Works. Starting in 2014, she bushwhacked the entirety of the 108-mile, 200-year-old Navigation system, documenting the stone ruins of locks, dams, and aqueducts. She’ll show some of these hand-built works, most from the 1840s. She will also address the Navigation’s role in the Industrial Revolution, as canal boats brought anthracite coal from Schuylkill County to tidewater at Philadelphia. The dams, development, and coal waste caused a pollution disaster requiring a major river cleanup, which buried many of the historic sites – fortunately not all of them. Sandy’s project has been supported by the Charles E. Peterson Fellowship Fund of the Athenaeum of Philadelphia.

Photographer and urban planner Sandy Sorlien will present photographs, maps, and drawings from her upcoming book, Inland: The Abandoned Canals of the Schuylkill Navigation. (Fall, 2022)

Zoom information will be sent the day of the event. Register here to receive the link for the free talk.

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/inland-the-abandoned-canals-of-the-schuylkill-navigation-tickets-155967564183?aff=odeieiconstantcontact&ctct_id=d97d60a8-7386-425b-b3db-536876944aed_p2&ctct_c=haIni0rTSE0YUBOVeAsE2kK4FmRf45Ym69urtMWJdRM6l7Dx8DdLWA==

In case you missed Bob Thomas’s canal presentation for The Lower Merion Conservancy, it is available as a recording in the link below. 1821 to 2021: 200 Years on Our Regional Network of Historic Canals

The webinar recording is now available on the Conservancy’s website. Please feel free to share with friends and neighbors!

Philadelphia Railroads

An Oliver Evans Chapter Program
presented by Joel Spivak

Wednesday, June 2, 2021
7:00 – 8:30

book cover01

Philadelphia, “the workshop of the world,” produced locomotives, railcars, interiors, wheels, and tracks. Some of the earliest railroads in the country operated in Philadelphia and left a legacy of treasures around the city.

Take a virtual tour and hear about Joel’s love of the railroad and how he developed a lifelong interest in the subject.

The book, “Philadelphia Railroads,” by Allen Myers and Joel Spivak, is a tribute to Oliver Evans, the inventor of the American “High Pressure Steam Engine.”

Chapter member Joel Spivak is a native of Philadelphia and has had a varied career in architecture and the arts. His community service is legendary, and has benefited neighborhoods all over the city. Projects he was involved in include creating the South Street Renaissance and defeating the Crosstown Expressway in the 1970s, the opening of Rocketships & Accessories space toy store in the ’80s, and winning the “Outstanding Achievement in Design for Affordable Housing” HUD award in the 1990s. He created and managed a Little League baseball team at Sack’s Playground at 5th & Washington in the early ’90s, and has created events for National Hot Dog Month for the past 10 years. In addition, he has written three books on transportation history in Philadelphia. He was awarded “Citizen of the First Rank” by City Council for his lifetime commitment to his neighborhood and the city of Philadelphia.

The program will be presented through a Zoom meeting. 

Pre-registration is required to receive the link to the Zoom meeting.

To register, please send an email indicating your interest to the Chapter address: oesiaphila@gmail.com

Reminder: 200 Years on Our Regional Network of Historic Canals

A presentation By Bob Thomas
Hosted by the The Lower Merion Conservancy

Thursday, May 13
7:00-8:30 pm

Two hundred years ago – before the age of railroads — an extensive canal system served our region, linking Philadelphia with major points from Chesapeake Bay to Canada and from Pittsburgh to New York City. Learn from historian, planner, and architect, Bob Thomas, where this system was located, how it worked, where extensive parts of it survive to this day, and how to visit and enjoy this great historic resource.

ZOOM, pre-registration required for link to program

Register through link below:

https://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/eventReg?oeidk=a07ehp89unyb86b0f4f&oseq=&c=&ch=

200 Years on Our Regional Network of Historic Canals

A presentation By Bob Thomas
Hosted by the The Lower Merion Conservancy

Thursday, May 13
7:00-8:30 pm

Canala

The Delaware and Lehigh Canal and Towpath just north of Weissport, Carbon County, PA 
© 2020 – Robert P. Thomas, AIA

Two hundred years ago – before the age of railroads — an extensive canal system served our region, linking Philadelphia with major points from Chesapeake Bay to Canada and from Pittsburgh to New York City. Learn from historian, planner, and architect, Bob Thomas, where this system was located, how it worked, where extensive parts of it survive to this day, and how to visit and enjoy this great historic resource.

ZOOM, pre-registration required for link to program

Register through link below:

How Philly and Pennsylvania grew to dominate the candy industry

Peeps

In the early 20th century, Philly was considered the candy capital of the United States. The industry had exploded in the city from just 20 small stores in the early 1800s to more than 130 shops, manufacturers, and distributors, according to a 1917 educational pamphlet from the Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce. Their combined sales volume was more than $7 million, equivalent to around $200 million today.

This article posted in Billy Penn mentions some of the most well-known candy manufacturers in the city and state. 

https://billypenn.com/2021/04/04/how-philly-and-pennsylvania-grew-to-dominate-the-candy-industry/?mc_cid=cb735bf38a&mc_eid=86d78fe14e



GHOSTS OF WATER PART 2

Fairmount Park Conservancy presents

GHOSTS OF WATER PART 2

by Adam Levine, Historical Consultant, Philadelphia Water Department
 and creator of www.phillyh2o.org.

Thursday, April 1, at noon

Free, registration required at https://myphillypark.org/event/ghosts-of-water-webinar-part-2/

Adam Levine, historian for the Philadelphia Water Department, uncovers more ghosts of Fairmount Park’s watery past. Join him for this illustrated lecture as he talks about more abandoned reservoirs in Roxborough, another pumping station and standpipe in Holmesburg, swimming lakes (not pools) in East Falls and South Philadelphia, winter skating, and the steamboats that plied the Schuylkill through the 19th and early 20th century.

This talk is a follow-up to an earlier lecture, Ghosts of Water Part 1, which took place last October and can be found here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v48rUS1GKK0