Reminder: Oliver Evans Chapter Event

WILLIAM RAU’S PHILADELPHIA

A Glass Lantern Slide presentation by Martha Capwell Fox, Historian and Archives Coordinator, National Canal Museum/ Delaware & Lehigh National Heritage Corridor

Date: Wednesday, December 5, 2018

Time: 6PM Program     Reception to follow

Cost: $15 for members of sponsoring organizations and guests. $20 for all others.

ALL TICKETS MUST BE PURCHASED IN ADVANCE ON LINE. NO PAYMENT AT DOOR

       http://philachaptersah.org/index.php/category/chapter-programs/

Place: Wagner Free Institute of Science, 1700 W. Montgomery Ave., Philadelphia, PA 19121

Questions: E-mail: info@philachaptersah.org

Using the Wagner’s vintage glass lantern slide projector Martha will present a program featuring 19th-C views of Philadelphia by famed photographer William H. Rau, (January 19, 1855 – November 19, 1920).  Born in Philadelphia, at the age of 13, he started doing photographic work for his future father-in-law, William Bell, a medical and survey photographer for the federal government. In 1874, with Bell’s recommendation, Rau joined an expedition to Chatham Island in the South Pacific to photograph the Transit of Venus. After returning, Rau worked for the Centennial Photographic Company, the official photographers of Philadelphia’s 1876 Centennial Exposition. After the exposition, he joined his father-in-law’s stereo card studio, which he purchased in 1878. He operated this studio in partnership with his brother, George, until 1880. From that point into the 20th-C he traveled the world making photographs on commission for numerous groups.  He spent a significant portion of the 1890s doing photographic work for both the Lehigh Valley Railroad and the Pennsylvania Railroad, and published collections of his railroad photos in 1892 and 1900. He was the official photographer for the St. Louis World’s Fair in 1904 and the Lewis and Clark Centennial Exposition in Portland the following year. His work is now included in the collections of several prominent museums, libraries and archives around the world.

How It Works: Iron vs. Steel

ironsteel

Sunday, November 25th at 2pm

What is the difference between iron and steel? In this hands-on tour, guests will learn the basics of each material, then dive deeper to discover specific types of iron and steel, how production evolved over time, and what products they can be found in.

The National Museum of Industrial History “How It Works” series of tours are designed to help patrons further understand of specific facets of industrial history. The series is presented with NMIH’s Historian and includes behind-the-scenes looks at special collection items, artifacts, and aspects of the museum generally out of the public eye. This is the perfect chance to answer the questions of, “how does steam power work,” “how is steel made,” and more.

Admission for the “How It Works” tours is $5 in addition to regular museum admission. Complete visitor information at this link:  http://nmih.org/visit/

National Museum of Industrial History

602 E 2nd St,

Bethlehem, PA 18015

Telephone: 610.694.6644

FAX: 610.625.6204

E-mail: info@nmih.org

 

WILLIAM RAU’S PHILADELPHIA

2018-12- 05 Wm Rau Race St at Delaware Ave LOC 39906v

Rau photo, Race Street at Delaware Avenue

Oliver Evans Chapter/SIA, Philadelphia Chapter, Society of Architectural Historians and Wagner Free Institute of Science

present

WILLIAM RAU’S PHILADELPHIA

A Glass Lantern Slide presentation by Martha Capwell Fox, Historian and Archives Coordinator, National Canal Museum/ Delaware & Lehigh National Heritage Corridor

Date: Wednesday, December 5, 2018

Time: 6PM Program     Reception to follow

Cost: $15 for members of sponsoring organizations and guests. $20 for all others.

ALL TICKETS MUST BE PURCHASED IN ADVANCE ON LINE. NO PAYMENT AT DOOR

       http://philachaptersah.org/index.php/category/chapter-programs/

Place: Wagner Free Institute of Science, 1700 W. Montgomery Ave., Philadelphia, PA 19121

Questions: E-mail: info@philachaptersah.org

Using the Wagner’s vintage glass lantern slide projector Martha will present a program featuring 19th-C views of Philadelphia by famed photographer William H. Rau, (January 19, 1855 – November 19, 1920).  Born in Philadelphia, at the age of 13, he started doing photographic work for his future father-in-law, William Bell, a medical and survey photographer for the federal government. In 1874, with Bell’s recommendation, Rau joined an expedition to Chatham Island in the South Pacific to photograph the Transit of Venus. After returning, Rau worked for the Centennial Photographic Company, the official photographers of Philadelphia’s 1876 Centennial Exposition. After the exposition, he joined his father-in-law’s stereo card studio, which he purchased in 1878. He operated this studio in partnership with his brother, George, until 1880. From that point into the 20th-C he traveled the world making photographs on commission for numerous groups.  He spent a significant portion of the 1890s doing photographic work for both the Lehigh Valley Railroad and the Pennsylvania Railroad, and published collections of his railroad photos in 1892 and 1900. He was the official photographer for the St. Louis World’s Fair in 1904 and the Lewis and Clark Centennial Exposition in Portland the following year. His work is now included in the collections of several prominent museums, libraries and archives around the world.

The National Canal Museum’s collection of Rau glass lantern slides was a gift from Professor Charles Best, who was chair of the engineering department at Lafayette College.  There are over 1200 slides in his collection, but we will see about 80 of the best of Philadelphia.

Martha Capwell Fox has been with the National Canal Museum for six years, but has a three decades-long relationship with the Museum through former Director Lance Metz. She graduated from American University with a dual degree in International Relations and History. She spent most of her career in publishing; working at National Geographic and was a senior editor at Rodale Press. She has published seven books, four Arcadia books on local Lehigh Valley history, and YA histories of swimming, auto racing and Vatican City.  Her latest book, “Geography, Geology, and Genius: The Industrial History of the Delaware & Lehigh National Heritage Corridor” is in production and should be out by the end of the year.

The talk will take place in the historic Lecture Hall of the Wagner Free Institute of Science and is followed by a reception in the Museum.

About the Wagner: Founded in 1855, the Wagner Free Institute of Science is dedicated to providing free public education in science. Its programs serve all ages and include evening science courses—the oldest free adult education program in the country—lectures, field trips and children’s lessons. The Wagner is also committed to preserving and interpreting its National Historic Landmark building, designed by John McArthur, which opened in 1865. The building houses a Victorian-era lecture hall, a library, and three-story exhibition hall displaying more than 100,000 natural history specimens. The site is virtually unchanged since the 1890s. The Wagner today is both an educational institution that teaches contemporary science, and a historic site that presents a time capsule of Victorian science. It is open to visitors Tuesdays – Fridays, 9 AM to 4 PM, year-round, and offers an array of evening and weekend programs throughout the year. It is located at 1700 W. Montgomery Avenue, a few blocks from Temple University’s main campus and the Temple-Cecil B. Moore Broad Street Line station.

Poth Brewery, Brewerytown

PothBrewery

A post from Rich Wagner

Wow, Brewerytown is poppin’. Took the Hidden City tour of Poth brewery with people from the firm that is planning to develop the building for housing. This joins a growing list of brewery preservation success stories in Philadelphia!

I hadn’t been inside since my Philadelphia Brewery Tour in 1996 when it was Red Bell and people on my tour got to sample beer from the zwickle thanks to Jim Cancro, brewer, who gave us the tour. Well, the Red Bell sign is faded but they’re breathing new life into this beauty.

At the conclusion of the tour Larry Handy and I did a “pop up” breweriana exhibit of Poth and Brewerytown breweriana!

Across the street the 200 horse stable of the Bergner & Engel Brewing Co. is also being restored.

Then there’s the mural a block away which is fantastic composite, showing names of the breweries of Brewerytown, old and new.

And of course, around the corner up Girard Ave. is Crime and Punishment, currently the only brewery in Brewerytown.

Below is a link to the story of the F.A. Poth Company from the 1860s to the 1930s The Jewel of Brewerytown: Past, Present, and  Future at the Poth Brewery, A Thesis in Historic Preservation by Mary Elizabeth Feitz, 2015 

https://repository.upenn.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1583&context=hp_theses

PHILADELPHIA AND THE GREAT WAR

Armistice

This November 11th marks the 100th anniversary of the signing of the Armistice, bringing an end to “The War to End All Wars”. The treaty was signed on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month in 1918.

For years people would stand at that time for a moment of silence to honor those who made the ultimate sacrifice. Over 3,000 Philadelphians made that sacrifice.

To commemorate this historic event and the contribution that Philadelphians made, I am bringing to Philadelphia a travelling exhibit that will include photographs of those who served from our area.

The exhibit will be here for two days – November 11th (the actual day) and November 12th. I am looking for sponsors and a site on the commercial corridor for the exhibit and for photos of those that served in the war.

Please contact me at joelspivak@comcast.net.

Please copy this information and send to anyone you think who may wish to participate.

 

Fetter’s Mill, along the Pennypack Creek

FettersMill

Open House Tours

Alnwick Grove Historical Society

Sunday Oct 28 1-4

2517 Fetter’s Mill Rd 19006

Fetter’s Mill at Fetter’s Mill Road and Pennypack Creek in Huntingdon Valley is a rare historic treasure.  During the 18th and 19th centuries, more than 40 water powered mills operated on the 20 mile-long Pennypack Creek and its tributaries.  The 5-story Fetter’s Mill, built circa 1750 by Joshua Morris and enlarged in the 1850’s by George Fetter, is the last one, essentially intact and exhibiting unaltered historic grist mill features.   Local historian and Alnwick Grove Historical Society member Fred Moore will conduct tours of the mill and mill race and dam. Open to all.

Note:  Fetter’s Mill Road Bridge, a metal through-truss bridge built 1883 and a historic treasurer in its own right, is currently closed to vehicular traffic, but safe for foot traffic.  Best access to the mill is from Huntingdon Pike via the bridge across from the Bryn Athyn Post Office (999 Fetters Mill Rd). Near and on-site parking is limited.  Consider parking at the Pennypack Trails parking lot at Welsh Rd and Terwood Rd and walking the scenic 3/4 mile along the creek to the mill on the old Philadelphia to Newtown Railroad track-bed recently converted as part of the Rails-to-Trails Project.

Also:  Local artist Donnette Glenn will be featured at Fetter’s Mill on Saturday, Oct 27, 10 AM- 6 PM.