What Saving the Newkirk Monument Taught Us, and What We Still Don’t Know

2019-09-21 Newkirk Monument PRRTHS

In 1838, the Philadelphia, Wilmington, and Baltimore Railroad completed the first rail line between its namesake cities, a landmark feat that would eventually link Boston and New York to the nation’s capital. The following year, the railroad’s board commemorated the effort with a 15-foot marble obelisk at the western foot of its bridge at Grays Ferry. Inscribed on this Newkirk Monument were the names of the four railroads that merged to form the PW&B, and 51 of their executives, engineers, and contractors. For years, the Monument held a place of honor along the Pennsylvania Railroad’s line to Washington, D.C. But by the 21st century, the obelisk was eroding and largely forgotten, until a remarkable coalition of government and private groups came together to save it. The Monument has much to tell us about Philly’s railroads in the Age of Jackson — yet some things remain shrouded in history. Please join us for a talk about the Newkirk Monument, and perhaps even to help us solve its remaining mysteries.

September 21, 2019 1:30 PM

Drexel Hill Methodist Church
600 Burmont Road
Drexel Hill, PA 19026

More about  PRRT&HS

The Philadelphia Chapter of the Pennsylvania Railroad Technical & Historical Society (PRRT&HS), is a Pennsylvania non-profit corporation, is a qualified independent 501(c)(3) Chapter of the Society. The Chapter was formed, by members of the society interested in the Pennsylvania Railroad (PRR). The Chapter strives to preserve the history and memory of the Pennsylvania Railroad operations in the greater Philadelphia area. It publishes the “High Line/Keystone Chronicles” magazine on an annual basis. The active information interchange between members and that offered to the public through our publications and internet activity, is greatly enhanced by the many long time rail fans and former PRR employees among our membership. Chapter members possess many areas of interest, experience and expertise… Please share this newsletter with a perspective new member and invite them to a future meeting as a guest!

http://www.philaprrths.com

Underground Philadelphia: From Caves and Canals to Tunnels and Transit

September 18 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

This free program will take place inside the church sanctuary, followed by a reception in Riverside Hall with live piano music provided by the Jazz Sanctuary. For a modest donation, enjoy gourmet cheesecake by a local pastry chef, paired with moscato wine, coffee or tea.

If you plan to go to this event, the church would appreciate your confirming a reservation. As of a few days ago 55 people had confirmed attendance. Here is the link:

Underground Philadelphia: From Caves and Canals to Tunnels and Transit

MILLS OF THE DELAWARE VALLEY

Locksley Mill Creek Road, Thornbury Twp (Dan Campbell)

Locksley Mill Creek Road, Thornbury Twp

A presentation of The Middeltown Township Historical Society

by Daniel T. Campbell 

AIA, architect and President of the Mid-Atlantic Chapter of SPOOM (The Society for the Preservation of Old Mills, www.spoommidatlantic.org)

Thursday, September 26 at 7:00 p.m.

From the beginning of European settlement the creeks of Chester County (from which Delaware County was created in 1789) were a source of revenue for area residents. In 1699 William Penn partnered with Caleb Pusey and Samuel Carpenter to operate a grist mill along Chester Creek in Upland, only one of the hundreds of grist, saw, fulling and other mills, that lined the banks of our County’s waterways flowing into the Delaware River going north from the Brandywine, to Chester, Ridley, Crum, Darby and Cobbs Creeks. Join Dan for the fascinating history of milling in southeastern PA and the process of locating and identifying these mills, whether still existing, re-purposed or in some degree of decay.

Lima Estates, 411 North Middletown Road, Media, PA

Free and open to the public, no registration required.

Mill stones (Dan Campbell)

UNDERGROUND PHILADELPHIA: FROM CAVES AND CANALS TO TUNNELS AND TRANSIT

Historic Gloria Dei Preservation Corporation presents

A Book Talk with authors Harry Kyriakodis and Joel Spivak

Wednesday, September 18th, 7:00 – 8:30 PM

Philadelphia’s relationship with the underground is as old as the city itself, dating back to when Quaker settlers resided in caves alongside the Delaware River more than three hundred years ago. The City of Brotherly Love later became a national and world leader in the delivery of water, gas, steam, and electricity during the industrial age. Join authors Harry Kyriakodis and Joel Spivak as they reveal the curious aspects of the Quaker City’s underground experience.

Historic Gloria Dei Church, 916 S Swanson Street, Philadelphia, PA

Admission is free, no registration required.

UndergroundBook.png

 

 

 

 

 

 

Historic Gloria Dei Church, 916 S Swanson Street, Philadelphia, PA

 

Admission is free, no registration required.

 

Mill Creek to Sewer

1280px-Mill_Creek_West_Philadelphia_1883
Mill Creek Sewer, ca. 1883, at 47th Street and Haverford Avenue in West Philadelphia. The effort to encapsulate and bury Mill Creek in a 21-foot (6.4 m) sewer pipe ran from 1869 to 1894

June 25th, 6:30 pm

Adam Levine, historian at the Philadelphia Water Department, will talk on the fascinating history of Mill Creek, encapsulated as a sewer from 1869 to 1895. Hear updates on work happening this summer at 43rd and Baltimore.

June 25th at 6:30 p.m. Doors will open at 6:15 p.m. The McNeil Science and Technology Center, University of the Sciences, room 145 , 600 S 43rd St, Philadelphia, PA 19104

RSVP recommended but not required at facebook.com PhillyH2O. Check out Adam’s website, a great resource on Philadelphia water history. http://www.phillyh2o.org/index.htm

Underground Philadelphia: From Caves and Canals to Tunnels and Transit

UndergroundBook

Philadelphia’s relationship with the underground is as old as the city itself, dating back to when Quaker settlers resided in caves alongside the Delaware River more than three hundred years ago. The City of Brotherly Love later became a national and world leader in the delivery of water, gas, steam, and electricity during the industrial age. The construction of multiple subway lines within Center City took place during the early twentieth century. An intricate subsurface pedestrian concourse was also developed throughout the downtown area for the city’s inhabitants. From Thirtieth Street Station and Reading Terminal to the Commuter Rail Tunnel and transit lines that were never built, Philadelphia’s infrastructure history is buried under the earth as much as above. Join authors Harry Kyriakodis and Joel Spivak as they reveal the curious aspects of the Quaker City’s underground experience.


Harry Kyriakodis is a librarian, historian and writer about Philadelphia and has collected what is likely the largest private collection of books about the City of Brotherly Love—more than 2,800 titles, new and old. He is a founding/certified member of the Association of Philadelphia Tour Guides and gives walking tours and presentations on unique yet unappreciated parts of the city for various groups. Once an officer in the U.S. Army Field Artillery, Harry is a graduate of La Salle University (1986) and Temple University School of Law (1993). He is also the author of Philadelphia’s Lost Waterfront (2011) and Northern Liberties: The Story of a Philadelphia River Ward (2012), both published by The History Press, and The Benjamin Franklin Parkway (2014), a postcard history book from Arcadia Publishing. Harry is a member of the Philadelphia chapter of the Society for Industrial Archaeology and also writes regularly for the blog Hidden City Philadelphia.

Joel Spivak is an architect, artist, author and community activist in Philadelphia, where he helped lead the renaissance of South Street in the 1970s and early 1980s by coordinating with artists and builders. He opened his own specialty toy store, Rocketships & Accessories, and in 1992 co-founded Philadelphia Dumpster Divers, an artists’ collective. Nicknamed the “Trolley Lama” for his expertise in Philadelphia’s public transit history, Joel has a degree in industrial arts and is a member of the Philadelphia chapter of the National Railway Historical Society. His books include Philadelphia Trolleys (2003) and Philadelphia Railroads (2010), both with Allen Meyers and part of Arcadia’s “Images of Rail” series. Joel also self-published Market Street Elevated Passenger Railway Centennial, 1907–2007 for the 100th anniversary of the El. He originated Philadelphia’s National Hot Dog Month celebration, which spotlights both non-vegan and vegan sandwiches. His wife is artist Diane Keller.

ISBN: 9781625859730
Publisher: The History Press
Date: 02/11/2019
State: Pennsylvania
Images: 67 Black And White
Dimensions: 6 (w) x 9 (h)

Below is a link to the publisher’s website where the book can be ordered.
https://www.arcadiapublishing.com/Products/9781625859730

The Oliver Evans Chapter is planning an authors’ presentation this coming Spring. Copies of the book will be available for purchase at this event.

 

Dinner Deadline Extended

Dear Members,

A final reminder to make reservations for our 34th Annual Dinner Meeting to be held at Gallo’s Restaurant on Roosevelt Blvd. at Stanwood St. in Philadelphia. By various personal  testimonials, the food at Gallo’s is excellent. The dinner will be buffet with four different main course selections.

Please note that we have changed the day from our usual Friday to Saturday, Feburary 2nd to avoid the ever-present Friday rush-hour traffic. the speaker for the evening will be Fred Moore, Historian with the Northeast Philadelphia History Network and his subject will be “The Birth of the US Airmail Service” with its first stop at the Bustleton Airfield in NE Phila.

New Deadline for reservations is this coming Thursday, January 31st.

Just phone or email Tom Brady with number of reservations

PHONE 215-518-8038                   EMAIL tabradyjr43@gmail.com